Mental Health & Wellbeing

The 'How Are You' Project is Launched in Broughshane?

The How Are Project launches this May

Northern Ireland's 'How Are You' Mental Health & Wellbeing Facebook Support page founder Mark Dunseath and Broughshane & District Community Association launch 'The How Are You Project' Family and Friends Focus Group events taking part in Broughshane House this Spring.     

Dates for your Diary

Monday 20th May at 7pm

Monday 24th June at 7pm

Monday 29th July at 8pm

Guest Speakers to be announced shortly - Light Supper Included

Broughshane House

Main St, Broughshane

Download more information here
Register your interest in attending our focus groups by calling Broughshane House on 028 2586 2777
or contact the 'How Are You' Facebook Page.
If you have URGENT SUPPORT needs, you should contact your GP, or Dalriada Urgent Care on 028 2566 3500 out of hours service or LIFELINE freephone 24/7 helpline - 0808 808 8000
Leaflets and Brochures Offering Guidance and Support is Available to Download

Mental wellbeing describes your mental state - how you are feeling and how well you can cope with day-to-day life.

Our mental wellbeing is dynamic. It can change from moment to moment, day to day, month to month or year to year.

 

If you have good mental wellbeing you are able to:

  • feel relatively confident in yourself and have positive self-esteem

  • feel and express a range of emotions

  • build and maintain good relationships with others

  • feel engaged with the world around you

  • live and work productively

  • cope with the stresses of daily life

  • adapt and manage in times of change and uncertainty

 

If you experience low mental wellbeing over a long period of time, you are more likely to develop a mental health problem. If you already have a mental health problem, you're more likely to experience periods of low mental wellbeing than someone who hasn't. But that doesn't mean you won't have periods of good wellbeing. Below we look at steps you can take to manage your mental wellbeing, whether you have a mental health diagnosis or not, and what support is available if you need it.

 

Think about what is affecting your wellbeing. 

We're all different. What affects someone's mental wellbeing won't necessarily affect others in the same way.

But we all have times when we have low mental wellbeing, where we feel stressed, upset or find it difficult to cope.

 

Common life events that can affect your mental wellbeing include:

 

Stress, loneliness, inactivity, lack of sleep are all negative for your mental wellbeing.

Other times there is no clear reason for why we feel the way we do - which can be frustrating.

There are some factors that may make you more vulnerable to experiencing a period of poor mental wellbeing. These may have happened  in the past or might still be happening now:

  • childhood abuse, trauma, violence or neglect

  • social isolation or discrimination

  • homelessness or poor housing

  • a long-term physical health condition

  • social disadvantage, poverty or debt

  • unemployment

  • caring for a family member or friend

  • significant trauma as an adult, such as military combat, being involved in a serious accident or violent crime

 

No matter the reason, it can be helpful to remember that you deserve to feel good and there are steps you can take to improve and maintain your mental wellbeing.

 

Connecting with others can help us to feel a greater sense of belonging and can help to challenge feelings of loneliness.

  • Make time for the people you love. Keeping regular contact with friends and family, whether it's face-to-face, on the phone or by text, can strengthen your relationships.

  • Join a group. Think of the things you like to do, such as drawing, gardening or sport and look for local groups. Meeting others with a shared interest can increase your confidence and build your support network.

  • Talk about the way you feel. Opening up to a trusted friend or family member can help you to feel listened to and supported. Just acknowledging your feelings by saying them out loud can help.

  • Use peer support. If you're finding things difficult, talking to people who have similar feelings or experiences can help you to feel accepted. 

  • Volunteer at a local school or hospice. Giving your time to those that need it can be extremely fulfilling and can help you to look at things from a different perspective. 

Leaflets and Brochures Offering Guidance and Support is Available to Download
If you have URGENT SUPPORT needs, you should contact your GP, or Dalriada Urgent Care on 028 2566 3500 out of hours service or LIFELINE freephone 24/7 helpline - 0808 808 8000
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